Eva Jordan in conversation with @SVaughanAuthor

This month I’m really honoured to be chatting to the lovely, and very talented Sarah Vaughan. Sarah is the author of four novels, including her current international bestseller, Little Disasters, which was released as a paperback on the 4th March and is also my book of choice for this month’s book review, which you can read here. Sarah’s critically acclaimed third novel, Anatomy of A Scandal (read my review here), is at present being filmed as a Netflix series with an all-star cast including Sienna Miller, Michelle Dockery, and Rupert Friend, which I for one can’t wait to see! Fingers crossed it does the book justice. If the cast is anything to go by, I’d say that’s highly probable.

Welcome Sarah, thanks for being my guest today. Can you tell us all a bit about yourself? I understand you used to be a news reporter and political correspondent on the Guardian?

I read English at university then did a regional newspaper journalism course and joined the Press Association as a trainee. After 20 months I was working on the Guardian, first as a news reporter, ultimately working on stories like the murder of Sarah Payne and the Soham murders, and then as a political correspondent – joining just as we went to war with Iraq under Tony Blair. I left the lobby after my first baby, and left the Guardian to freelance, in 2008, after my second was born. But I hated freelancing and the week that I turned 40 and my youngest started school I started my first novel, The Art of Baking Blind. It was bought in a pre-empt 13 months later.

Having read English at Oxford as a student, I assume you’ve always had an interest in writing? And if so, what writers have inspired you?

Absolutely. As a teen, I remember reading Jane Austen and DH Lawrence and trying to tease out what they were doing with language. I also devoured Agatha Christies and some Daphne du Maurier (I read Rebecca at 13 but, as with my reading Jane Eyre at nine! failed to understand the darkness of it all). As a writer, the list’s endless but I’m always interested in anything new by Kate Atkinson, Hilary Mantel, Elizabeth Strout, David Nicholls. I’ve also learned from writer peers writing clever psychological thrillers such as Lucy Atkins, Susie Steiner, Louise Candlish, Erin Kelly, Sabine Durrant, Eve Chase.

Although a difficult subject matter, I thought your fourth novel, Little Disasters, was brilliant, wonderfully written. However, for me, out of the two, Anatomy of A Scandal is probably my favourite. Not by much, I hasten to add, but at the time of reading it, with global movements like #MeToo and #TimesUp taking place, it felt, and still does, very socially and politically poignant. How do you feel about this story being turned into a Netflix series? The cast looks amazing. Have you had any input or say in the casting or the filming?  

There is absolutely no negative to having your novel filmed by Netflix and I have loved the process. I’m very lucky in that I’m an executive producer so have felt very in the loop re casting, though I’ve no creative control, and have been able to offer feedback on various drafts of the scripts. Filming started at the start of November and will continue into the spring, but because of covid I haven’t yet been on set. Beyond wanting it to be filmed in the UK, I haven’t had any input into that locations, but they are incredible. It’s being part produced by the team behind The Undoing and I think it will look equally visually stunning.

And finally, the question I love to ask all writers! For anyone thinking of becoming a writer, what advice would you offer?

It’s a real cliché but read. Read in your genre and out of it and read thoughtfully. What is Austen saying about Mrs Bennett there? How is she doing it? How is Mantel getting us inside Cromwell’s head? I’d also pick apart a novel in the genre you want to write. Where are the peaks and troughs, the cliff-hangers, the twists? How does the author make you want to read on? Are there plot holes? Are the characters consistent and psychologically credible? I’d also recommend John Yorke’s Into the Woods, which I read before writing Anatomy. Don’t show it to anyone too early – you don’t want your confidence crushed; be persistent; be diligent; keep going. And good luck!

Little Disasters is on sale in Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Waitrose, Asda, and all independent bookstores.

Book Review – Little Disasters by @SVaughanAuthor published by @simonschusterUK

“Being a mother is learning about strengths you didn’t know you had… and dealing with fears you didn’t know existed” –Linda Wooten

Having read and loved Sarah Vaughan’s 3rd novel, Anatomy of a Scandal, which is currently being filmed as a Netflix series with an all-star cast including Sienna Miller, Michelle Dockery and Rupert Friend, I couldn’t wait to read this, the author’s 4th novel.

I’m pleased to say it didn’t disappoint.

The author’s skilful and emotive storytelling immediately drew me in, reminding me of my own early days as a mother. How exhausting and overwhelming it can sometimes feel – “The cry builds. At first it is pitiful… Tentative, tremulous, just testing how it will be received… cranks up a gear as she draws the baby close… her eyes well[ing] with self-pity and frustration and an exhaustion so entrenched she is sometimes knocked off balance”.

The two main protagonists of this taut thriller are Jess, a mother of three, including her infant daughter Betsey, and her best friend Liz, also a mum and senior registrar of paediatrics at their local London hospital. From the outside looking in, Jess gives the impression of being the perfect stay at home mum. However, when she arrives at the hospital A&E department with Betsey, who appears to have suffered some sort of head trauma, Liz is both concerned and confused by her friend’s behaviour. Jess, who doesn’t seem particularly worried about her baby girl, is aloof, detached, which Liz knows is completely out of character for Jess. Liz wants to help her friend but when she questions Jess about what happened and Jess refuses to open up, Liz starts to fear the worst. She knows she has a duty of care towards Betsey, but she also knows that her next decision could have a huge impact on both on Jess and her family, and their friendship.  

Little Disasters is a tense, thought-provoking thriller that cleverly and considerately explores the complexities of early motherhood and post-natal anxiety. However, it is also a story about friendship. About the public facade we often hide behind, and how, wrapped up in our own lives and our perception of others, a cry for help can go unnoticed… sometimes with devastating consequences.

Little Disasters is on sale in Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Waitrose, Asda, and all independent bookstores.

 
It’s also available here at Waterstones and here at WH Smiths.

And click below to get your copy at Amazon.



Book Review – Love Letters of Great Women by Ursula Doyle published by @MacmillanUSA

“I used to look at all these daft girls, marrying the first fellow they thought they could live with. And I suppose I was waiting for the fellow I couldn’t live without” –Nora Doyle 1917-2007

Well folks, Valentine’s Day, universally recognised as a celebration of romance and love, is just around the corner. So, with that in mind, my book choice this month makes for the perfect read, not to mention a great gift idea.

Covering a multitude of famous women, including queens, writers, artists and politicians from 1399 up to WWI, this beautiful volume begins with a brief history of each letter writer, reminding us of not just the era they lived in but also the social restrictions they often encountered and how “affairs of the heart could irrevocably alter the course of woman’s life in a way they did not a man’s”. Take, for instance, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu’s letter to her beloved, whom she was planning to elope with against her father’s wishes, “I tremble for what we are doing. Are you sure you will love me forever? Shall we never repent? I fear, and I hope”. Her fear is obvious and her anxiety palpable, almost jumping off the page. However, like so many other heart-felt letters in this lovely collection, there are also examples of passionate longing and desire, while others still reveal true heartbreak and despair. Particularly Queen Victoria’s letter to the King of the Belgians shortly after the death of her beloved Albert, “My life as a happy one is ended! The world is gone for me!” Yet, the common thread throughout this book reveals women of great emotional strength whose belief in love is unwavering.

My verdict…

This beautiful hardback edition of Love Letters of Great Women is the companion to Love Letters of Great Men and a must read for hopeless romantics and history lovers alike. A delightful compendium that also serves as a timely reminder (especially in this digital age of quick-fire texting and emailing, no longer given to letter writing by hand) of just how beautiful the written word is. And how, in the wonderful words of writer Phyllis Grissim-Theroux, “to send a letter is a good way to go somewhere, without moving anything but your heart”.

Eva Jordan in conversation with Louise Beech @LouiseWriter @OrendaBooks

Happy New Year everyone! Fingers crossed it’s a good one. I thought I’d start this year with a Q&A, and this month I’m honoured to be chatting to the lovely Louise Beech, author of six novels and her, hopefully, soon to be released memoir, Daffodils. I recently read, and highly recommend Louise’s 4th novel, The Lion Tamer Who Lost; a heartfelt love story with a twist, set in Zimbabwe and Hull. Read my review here.

Welcome Louise, thanks for chatting to me today. Can you tell everyone a bit about yourself?

Hello, Eva. So lovely of you to ask me here for this festive Q&A! Well … about me? Isn’t that always a hard one? I live in East Yorkshire (Yorkshire girl born and bred) with my husband; our two grown children have flown the nest now. Before lockdown, I worked as a theatre usher (which I love, because I get to see all the shows!) and I am of course also a writer. I’m passionate about the arts, about supporting writers, and do my best always to give back if I can. For example, I’m part of the Women of Words, which is a group of four women who host monthly open mic events where women can perform (often for the first time) in a safe and supportive space.

Did you always want to be a writer, and if so, what writers have inspired you?

Oh yes, absolutely. When I was as young as three, I recall being in the back of the car, looking out at the treetops and sky and clouds, making up stories in my head. As soon as I could write, I wrote them down, filling exercise books. As a kid, I loved Judy Blume and Paul Zindel. Then when I read Flowers in the Attic by Virginia Andrews aged 15, I knew I wanted to write something like that. In later years, the book that finally made me sit down and write my first proper novel (which was actually Maria in the Moon) was John Irving’s The World According to Garp. It was … stunning. It moved me beyond words. The writing was magic. And I started my own first within days. Now, there are so many authors I admire; Marcus Zusak, Liz Nugent, Margaret Atwood…

I understand that your debut novel, How To Brave, was based on true events. Without giving too much of the story away, can you elaborate?

It was about my grandad, a merchant seaman who was lost at sea during the Second World War. Colin’s ship sank in the middle of the South Atlantic Sea in 1943. Fourteen men managed to get to a lifeboat. Fifty days later, only two were left. It’s an incredible story of bravery, one that I shared with my seven-year-old daughter after she was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes and refused her injections. Each day we shared a bit of the story, so it distracted her, and I could administer the much-needed insulin. We both became brave, in essence, because of Grandad Colin’s bravery. And I knew this needed to be explored in a novel. So, that story became the central plot of How to be Brave, my debut.

I believe you’ve recently finished writing a memoir? What inspired you to write it now, and how did it differ from writing fiction?

I began my memoir on 11th November 2019, the day my mum had her leg amputated. This followed a tragic suicide attempt nine months earlier, when she jumped from the Humber Bridge. By a miracle she survived, but with terrible injuries. On the morning of the jump, I was delayed by some beautiful early daffodils on a walk by the river … otherwise, I might have been there at the same time as she was. These daffodils haunted me. So that became my title: Daffodils. I’d always known I’d write a memoir because I had a tumultuous childhood, with time in care, and very unstable parents, but this seemed the perfect time. I wrote it during lockdown.

Wow, I can only imagine how hard that must have been for you and your family. However, I can also see why you then felt inspired to write your memoir and how, perhaps in some small way, it may have even helped you? They do say writing can be quite cathartic, after all. I sincerely hope your mum is doing better now.

And finally, the question I love to ask all writers! For anyone thinking of becoming a writer, what advice would you offer?

The main thing is never give up. You WILL experience many rejections and setbacks. The journey is likely to be long. But every single writer who has a book in a shop didn’t give up. Learn your craft well. Take on criticism. Read lots. Follow other authors and see what they advise. And follow your instinct with regards your voice. Only you can tell your story the way it should be told. Never forget that.

Visit Louise’s Amazon Author page here or her website www.louisebeech.co.uk

Book Review – The Lion Tamer Who Lost by @LouiseWriter published by @OrendaBooks

‘Be careful what you wish for, you’ll probably get it.’ –Proverb

My first book review this year is the wonderful, The Lion Tamer Who Lost, by the lovely Louise Beech. Written in the third person, this is an inspiring, albeit tragic love story set in the searing heat of Zimbabwe alongside the grey skies of Hull (England). Two distinct but contrasting landscapes. Both beautiful in their own way, but both harbingers of secrets, including some, as the story unfolds, better left unsaid. However, such secrets serve as a reminder of the yin and yang of life, and of what the harshness and tenderness of being human teaches us.

The two main protagonists are Andrew and Ben. Andrew is a writer, an occupation the author uses to tell a story within a story (mise en abyme), with each chapter beginning with an excerpt from Andrew’s book, which I found both clever and intriguing. Andrew, we learn, made a childhood wish, which he keeps in a silver box. However, when his wish eventually comes true, it isn’t in the way he’d hoped. Ben, on the other hand, is a student. Noticeably younger and less mature than Andrew, he nurtures a childhood dream to travel to Africa to volunteer at a lion reserve. But when Ben’s dream comes true, it isn’t for the reasons he imagined.

The Lion Tamer Who Lost is a sensitively written, thought provoking, emotive love story with a twist. Both the major and minor characters are well drawn and believable and, like most of us, are all wonderfully flawed and beautifully human, including Ben’s Dad, whom I really didn’t warm to at first, but later changed my mind. Although complex at times, ultimately, this is a simple story of love and loss, of courage and despair and a timely reminder of both the fragility and strength of life. A book I highly recommend.

You can find The Lion Tamer Who Lost here on Amazon

Silver Bells and Reindeer: A Short (very short!) Story for Christmas by Eva Jordan

Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay 

Lauren stared at the crackling fire, comforted by the rhythmic rise and fall of its amber flames. She sighed. Jamie was upstairs cleaning his teeth and Matt was outside securing the horses for the night. Christmas was less than a week away and Jamie had been asking questions. Said the kids at school had been saying things about Santa, questioning his existence. Concerned, Lauren and Matt had talked. Matt suggested it was time to come clean. Lauren agreed. However, watching her son, who had now swooped into the living room, dressing gown flapping behind him like Superman’s cape, she wasn’t so sure; felt overcome with sadness. Thorax tightening, she swallowed the plumb now lodged in her throat and smiled. Jamie grinned back, pointing to her mobile, now busily buzzing on the coffee table.        

            ‘It’s Dad,’ he said, picking it up and passing it to her, Matt’s cheery smile filling the screen.

            ‘Hey,’ said Lauren, putting the phone to her ear. ‘Everything OK?’

            Matt sounded concerned, explained how; about to lock up for the night, he’d come across a small deer.

            ‘He’s injured,’ Matt continued. ‘So I could do with your help to get him inside. He’ll freeze out here, otherwise.’

            Lauren and Jamie shrugged on their coats and raced outside to help. Next to the stable door appeared to be a small deer with a broken leg. Trembling, it stared at them through huge frightened eyes; kept making a strange bleating noise every time Matt tried to approach it.

            ‘Here, let me,’ said Lauren. Jamie watched in awe as his mother got down on her hands and knees and crawled towards the little deer until, eventually, it allowed her to stroke him. ‘There, there,’ she whispered. ‘We only want to help.’

            Between the three of them they carefully carried him into the stable and made him comfy for the night. The following day the vet visited, said the deer’s leg was sprained, but not broken. She strapped it up and under her guidance, Matt, Lauren and Jamie nursed the little deer back to health. Jamie loved looking after him, and the little deer loved letting him. Plus, the only time Santa was mentioned again was when Jamie pointed to a shiny silver bell hanging from a collar around the deer’s neck, saying, ‘I think he belongs to Santa.’

            On Christmas Eve it was time to set the little deer free. Jamie knew it was the right thing to do, but still, it wasn’t easy. However, wiping his tears with one hand and waving with the other, Jamie watched how, with one last glance back, his friend disappeared into the woods behind their house.

            On Christmas Day, stuffed from eating Christmas dinner, huddled on the sofa next to the twinkling Christmas tree, Lauren and Matt asked their son what his favourite gift was.

            ‘The silver bell at the bottom of my stocking,’ he replied, without hesitation.

            ‘That was so sweet of you to do that,’ Lauren whispered to Matt.

            Matt frowned. ‘Wasn’t me… I thought you’d put it there.’

©Eva Jordan

Merry Christmas everyone! X

Book Review –The Boy, The Mole, The Fox and The Horse by @charliemackesy published by @EburyPublishing

“Sometimes,” said the horse.

“Sometimes what?” asked the boy

“Sometimes just getting up and carrying on is brave and magnificent.”

Well folks, we’re well into December. The final month of what can only be described as an interesting year! However, before we say goodbye and good riddance to 2020 let’s not forget, for those of us that celebrate it, Christmas is fast approaching. Therefore, this month, unlike previous years when I’ve read and reviewed some very lovely Christmas themed stories, I thought I’d take a look at something different. Something simple yet poignant, and something that, if you’re looking for gift ideas for the book lovers in your life––whatever the age of the recipient––might just be the perfect solution because, unlike most books, this one is both ageless and timeless.

As the title suggests, this beautifully illustrated hardback is a tale about a boy, a mole, a fox and a horse, with the author and artist being one and the same. For younger readers it’s easy to follow the journey of these four very different friends, sometimes across great mountainous landscapes or beneath vast star-studded skies. While at other times they venture into the darkness, or attempt to navigate the clouds, and at others still, the focus is on the simple joy of eating cake. For older readers, however, I see this more as a collection of unassuming, yet inspiring quotes. Especially during moments of uncertainty and self-doubt, particularly during these troubled and ambiguous times, reminding us that, no matter how dire or dark things might seem, when observed through the eyes of The Boy, The Mole, The Fox and The Horse, we know there is always love, hope, and friendship.

Five Big Stars from me!

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Merry Christmas everyone, and remember, “Being kind to yourself is one of the greatest kindnesses”.

Book Review–F*ck, That’s Delicious: An annotated Guide to Eating Well by @ActionBronson and @rachelwharton Published by @ABRAMSbooks

“Food has been a part of my life, always.”

I can safely say this cookbook is, without a doubt, unlike any other I have read or reviewed before. Written by Ariyan Arslan, better known by the stage name Action Bronson––an American rapper, writer, chef, and television presenter—this unique cookbook was a birthday gift to my son from my daughter, partly inspired by his love of rap music but mostly because of his recent interest in cooking. He was thrilled when he received it and immediately took to the kitchen to try his hand at one of the recipes, which I have to say looked and smelled remarkably good.

Born to an American Jewish mother and an Albanian Muslim father, Bronson—described in the foreword as a “dude that looks like a cross between Godzilla, a handsome 1950s movie star from Europe, and a cult Mexican wrestler”—grew up in a small two-bedroomed apartment in Queens, New York, with his parents and grandparents. Home life, he says, was hectic, but always filled with love and the smell of good cooking. His grandmother, or nonna, who the book is dedicated to, would often bake three times a day, and it’s clear her love of food rubbed off on her grandson.

However, unlike standard cookbooks, this one is not just a compilation of illustrated recipes, of which there are a number, ranging from bagels to pizza, burgers to opihi, and bebidas to coffee cake, it is also jam-packed with pages of Bronson’s tours and travel, as well as some of his favourite eateries, both locally and around the world. But be warned… if you’re looking for healthy food, you won’t find it here. These recipes are all about flavour. Sprinkled with wit, swearing, and humorous back-stories (as well as a whole page dedicated to toothpicks), this colourful culinary journal is the perfect gift for all rap music and foodie enthusiasts alike.

You can purchase your copy below on Amazon

Pumpkins and Dragonflies: A Short Story for Halloween by Eva Jordan

Sally’s brother waited for her by the school gate. Arms folded, he was grinning, watching the other students file past. He was fatter in the face now. Looked more like the Ben from before. Before he got sick… before the cancer. He spotted her, raised his hand and waved. Sally waved back. Two girls walking beside her looked to see who she was waving at: exchanged glances and sniggered. Sally blushed; turned away.

            ‘Hey,’ said Ben, when she reached him. ‘Are those girls being mean?’        

            Sally waved her hand dismissively. ‘Nothing I can’t handle. They just think I’m a bit… weird. Anyway… how’s you?’

            Ben’s face deflated like a balloon. ‘OK… I suppose. Can’t wait till I’m well enough to start school again, though. Then I won’t have to listen to Mum and Dad arguing all the time.’

            ‘Did they argue this morning?’

            ‘Yep. As soon as you left. Then Dad stormed off and Mum started crying… again… before falling asleep. I wouldn’t mind, but she keeps sleeping on my bed for some weird reason?’               

            Sally’s heart sank.      

            ‘Do you think they’ll split up?’ continued Ben.

            Sally shrugged, unease fizzing in her belly. ‘I hope not. C’mon, let’s go home.’ They walked in silence for a few minutes; a copper carpet of leaves crunching beneath their feet. It was Halloween and scary looking pumpkin faces glared at them from the windows of the various houses they passed.

            ‘Do you remember that year we went Trick or Treating and you dressed up as a dragonfly?’

            Ben laughed. ‘Yeah. I do. I love dragonflies.’

            A sudden gust of wind stirred the leaves at their feet, scattering them like confetti. Giggling, Sally threw her hands up; caught a handful. Amongst them was a white feather. ‘Look,’ she said, showing Ben. ‘It’s a sign. It’s Nanna.’

            Ben rolled his eyes. ‘You don’t still believe in that rubbish do you… about angels and ghosts?’

            Sally shrugged. ‘Maybe…’

            At home, their mother, eyes red and still wearing her dressing gown, said she needed a nap. Sally made herself something to eat, then sat beside Ben at the table. He was studying the white feather she’d brought home.           

            ‘Before she passed away,’ said Sally, ‘Nanna used to say that a ghost is the spirit of a dead person stuck in this world because a loved one can’t or won’t let them go… and the only way for the ghost to move on is to give their loved one a sign; let them know they’re OK.’

            Ben looked stunned.

            The following day Ben didn’t meet Sally outside school, which saddened her a little, but it was a relief to see her Mum dressed and smiling again.

            ‘Look,’ said Sally’s mother, pointing to a picture of a dragonfly in one of Ben’s books. ‘It opened on this page when I picked it up. Then I heard a tapping noise at the window and when I looked up, I saw the most amazing dragonfly. And I knew, Sal… I just knew Ben was OK.’

©Eva Jordan

Eva Jordan In Conversation With @SELynesAuthor @bookouture

My book review this month, The Lies We Hide (which you can read here) is written by one of my favourite authors, Susie Lynes. It is both an emotional and moving story, exploring the fall-out of domestic abuse and the far-reaching effect it often has on all those involved. It is also, Susie explained, her sixth published novel, but was in fact the first book she ever wrote, making it very close to her heart. Here we find out why… and get to know her a little better…

Welcome Susie, thanks for chatting to me today. Can you tell me a little bit about yourself – I understand you used to work as a producer for the BBC?

I used to be a radio programme producer for the BBC in Scotland. I started by making five-minute features and progressed to producing a weekly magazine show. I left the BBC when I moved to Rome with my husband, Paul, and two kids, Alistair and Maddie. We lived there for five years before moving to Teddington. By this time we had our third child, Francesca. After settling the troops, I did a creative writing course at my local adult college then an MA in creative writing and went on to teach creative writing at Richmond Adult Community College. I wrote four novels before I broke through with my debut, Valentina.

Did you always want to be a writer, and if so what writers have inspired you?

Nothing in my working-class upbringing would have led me to aspire to writing novels; I would have felt embarrassed even mentioning it. Becoming an author is something that has happened on the side, while no one was looking. I just kept plugging away, returning always to the fact that I loved doing it. I have been inspired by many writers – Pat Barker, Alice Munro, Lorrie Moore, Gillian Flynn, Patricia Highsmith, Hilary Mantel, Barbara Vine and Sarah Waters are but a few.

How does the discipline of writing compare to teaching it?

I used to get so nervous before teaching that all I could eat beforehand was cake but there was no choice as to whether or not I turned up. When I teach, the discipline required is more along the lines of keeping the classes focussed and varied. I do get nervous before I sit and write sometimes, particularly if it’s a new project. The discipline consists of making myself sit at the desk, even if I’m not in the mood. It can take over an hour to get in the zone. I work best in solitude because I am naturally quite gregarious. I leave my phone in another room!

Do you believe taking a Masters in Creative Writing helped you? Is it a path to writing you would recommend to others?

It helped me personally because I struggled with confidence, especially after having children and leaving my career to live in Italy. But the MA gave me more than validation. I learnt the craft and even now I am quite a technical writer. I would recommend an MA to anyone as a worthwhile journey to take for its own sake but not as a way of getting published. It’s not necessary.

I’ve now read three of your novels and I’ve loved them all! But for me, The Lies We Hide was particularly good. Why is this story so close to your heart?

Thank you! The Lies We Hide is my only non-thriller so perhaps there was more latitude, more depth. It is close to my heart because it is pulled from my roots. When I spent a day in Lancaster prison for research, I found I didn’t need to change anything about my character Graham because I went to school with boys like him. TLWH is the first book I ever wrote and I was grateful to Bookouture for publishing it for me. The final version benefitted from all the elements of craft I’d learnt over the years through writing thrillers.

And finally, the question I love to ask all writers! For anyone thinking of becoming a writer, what advice would you offer?

Write every day. Set yourself a time and don’t agree to anything else at that time. Write before you do your chores because they will always get done while your writing will not. Take it seriously. You don’t have to tell anyone you’re taking it seriously; this can be your secret. Only do it if, when you sit down to write, you ‘awake’ hours later with no awareness of time passing. If you never get around to doing it, it could be that writing is not for you. It’s not for everyone, and there is no shame in that. Try and hold onto the fact that being rubbish or thinking you’re rubbish is part of the process. Ask yourself: do I enjoy it? If the answer is yes, carry on. The rest is vanity, after all.

If you’d like to know more about Susie, you can find her and her books at the following:

Amazon          https://goo.gl/HjLcMD

Kobo              https://goo.gl/hqp8so

iTunes            https://goo.gl/QLP25K

Facebook       http://goo.gl/fvGGpK

Twitter             http://goo.gl/WCuhh3